Why did the cookie cry?

Because his mother was a wafer so long.

I went on an oat kick and decided that I needed oatmeal cookies.

So I made them. I figured, they’re quick and easy and get the craving for something sweet taken care of. I had plans this past weekend to jump onto a tall ship that I used to work on for a few days, and figured that cookies would be a great portable treat. And, being a former crew member, I know just how much tall ship crew sometimes need a bit of sweet. It’s those little homemade touches that we sometimes miss, living and crewing a boat.

Speaking of the boat, if anyone in the CT area is looking for an awesome way to spend an afternoon, or to take an unusual vacation, check out the Mystic Whaler. She does brunch, lunch, and dinner cruises, as well as 3 to 5 day sails. It’s awesome. No, I’m not paid to say that, it’s just that awesome. Good food, great experiences, new friends. You can’t go wrong. And look at her!

mysticwhaler-0213-c3

Anyway, back to the boat cookies. Today’s recipe comes from the Flour cookbook. They aren’t my regular go-to, but I wanted to try something different, and I’ve made some delicious sweets from the book before.

Of course, I changed the recipe slightly…because why not. I upped the cinnamon for one,  and added vanilla, and some other little things here and there.

Mix. Bake. Om nom nom.

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Ingredients

1 c unsalted butter, at room temperature
2/3 c  granulated sugar
1 c packed light brown sugar
2 large eggs, at room temperature
1 3/4 c flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 3/4 c old –fashioned rolled oats (not instant or quick-cooking)
1 1/2 cups raisins

Method

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the butter and sugars until very light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.r5
  2. Meanwhile in a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, salt, nutmeg, and cinnamon, making sure there are no lumps of baking soda. Stir in the oats and raisins.r4
  3. Add the eggs, one at a time, and beat until thoroughly combined. On low speed, or by hand, gradually add the flour and oat mixture to the creamed butter, mixing until completely incorporated.r3
  4. Chill the batter a few hours or overnight, covered. (This step is optional, although recommended by the author. And it does change the overall shape of the cookie. Do it. I have a comparison at the end.)
  5. To bake the cookies, preheat the oven to 350ºF. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.r2
  6. Drop the dough in balls evenly spaced on the baking sheet and flatten the tops slightly with your hand.
  7. Midway during baking, rotate the baking sheet and tap the tops of the cookies down somewhat firmly with a spatula to flatten the domes.
  8. Bake the cookies for 15 to 20 minutes if you’re making normal sized cookies. If you are making the recommended large, 1/4 c scoop cookies, bake them for 20 to 22 minutes. In either case, bake until the cookies just start to turn brown across the top, but do not over bake.
  9. Allow to cool for 5 to 10 minutes on the baking sheet.
  10. Remove and allow to cool completely (or if you can’t wait, eat a few then)r1 The cookies on the left hadn’t been chilled before baking. How about THAT?